April 7 2009|06.15 PM UTC

Samantha Eckles

16 Depression Era Money Saving Tips

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We are often told that the current financial meltdown is the most serious since the Great Depression. And while that may be true, comparing today’s times to such an awful and demoralizing crisis has the effect of scaring people, thereby making the situation worse. This is the wrong way to react to the situation. Rather than passively absorbing fear and uncertainty, we would do well to remember that some people managed to stay afloat during the Great Depression – and to learn how they did it. In that vein, here are 16 Depression-era money saving tips and how they can be utilized today.

Pay Yourself First


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Without a good-sized chunk of money stashed aside, there is literally nothing standing between you and financial disaster. While you may manage to chug along the way things are now, the slightest change (a sudden spike in credit card rates, temporary loss of income, etc.) could send you reeling. That being said, it’s no surprise that paying yourself first by continuing to save was a common trait of people who survived the Great Depression. You should do the same today, no matter how uncomfortable or counter-intuitive it feels at the time.

Only Buy What You Truly Need


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Together with regular savings, buying only necessities forms the bedrock of the Depression mentality to surviving economic turmoil. You can bet that when people were jumping out of skyscrapers because their net worth evaporated overnight, the people who held it together were not blowing their money on excesses. Similarly, until you conduct a thorough inventory of your spending habits, methodically eliminate waste and ensure that you are only buying what you truly need to survive, you will not be as fortified from disaster as you could be.

Awaken Your Inner Bargain Hunter


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Another defining characteristic of Depression survivors was their relentless spirit of bargain hunting. When money is scarce and the future uncertain, there is simply no excuse for paying full sticker price on any of your purchases. Such times call for a different mentality, one of price comparisons and serious research into where the cheapest prices can be found. Luckily, the Internet makes this task far easier for today’s consumers than Depression-era bargain hunters. A few minutes of research before making any major purchases will usually assure you of getting a better deal.

Avoid Debt Like the Plague


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Today’s recession (much like the Depression of the 1930′s) was caused by excessive borrowing and debt. That being the case, it would be utterly foolish to exacerbate the problem by going into debt yourself (especially if you already have outstanding debt in the form of credit cards or loans.) Going into debt during a recession takes you from the frying pan into the fire, exposing you to the full wrath of collections agencies, ruined credit scores, and possibly even bankruptcy. Rather than allowing this to happen, adopt the Depression mentality: see debt as a plague to be avoided at all costs.

Discard Catalogs or Enticing Advertisements


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It is well known by psychologists that one’s environment has a great deal of influence on their behavior. Interestingly, a survey of Depression survivors by the Healthcare Council of Illinois revealed that many of those survivors promptly threw away mail-order catalogs and other enticing advertisements as soon they arrived. It was (and still is!) much easier to stay on your chosen path of frugality when you are not constantly surrounded by ads for things you don’t really need. Heed this advice today and you will be less tempted to splurge!

Question Every Expense


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Notwithstanding trust fund babies and lottery winners, people who survived the Great Depression didn’t do it by accident. One of their strengths was a refusal to accept any expense without tirelessly scrutinizing it. Only when it was determined that they were spending the least possible amount of money would they rest easy and pay it. You should adopt this same attitude with regard to any kind of services or ongoing fees that you pay, be it for insurance, home security systems, warranties, Internet connections, and even electricity. Haggle, negotiate, and shop around until you know it would be impossible for someone to spend less and still get what you’re getting.

Use Less Energy


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One of the familiar stories of the Depression era is homeowners who turned their home thermostats down and bundled up in coats and sweaters around the house. It’s uncomfortable to imagine going to that extreme and no one gets excited about using less of something to save money. That said, there is no faster, more straightforward way to save money so far discovered. Rather than seeing it as a painful sacrifice, make a game out of it. See how much less of everything you can use without making life unbearably worse. You might be surprised at how frugal you can be (and how much you can save) with heating, lights, and gas!

Buy in Bulk – Intelligently


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It’s no secret that buying in bulk can save you money by enabling you to take advantage of volume discounts. Unfortunately, it can also be taken too far, such that it actually costs you more money. Without careful discretion, you might wind up buying things you don’t actually need in bulk, because it’s in bulk, rationalizing that after all, you’re “saving money” on it. This completely defeats the purpose of buying in bulk, which is saving money on things you need to buy. Avoid this pitfall by only bulk buying necessities (ie, nutritious food) and not excesses (ie, 50 gallon drums of shampoo.)

Keep or Start a Garden


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Cutting down on restaurant meals means eating more meals at a home, but if you have to buy all your food ready-made, you still wont be saving as much as you could be. That’s why many Depression survivors kept backyard gardens to grow fresh fruits and vegetables. While there is still the cost of seeds and maintenance (ie, water costs), this is far cheaper than buying from stores and ensures that food costs are kept to the absolute minimum

Move to Where the Work is


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A tragic fact of the Depression is how many people suffered by staying in stagnant areas when they could have (perhaps at a high cost) moved somewhere more prosperous. Don’t make that mistake today! Many of those who came out of the Depression financially intact had the prescience to see that the job outlook at home would only get worse and the courage to move somewhere else. If you have the opportunity to do the same, take advantage of it.

Develop Multiple Income Streams


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It wasn’t called the Great Depression for nothing, but the gloom and doom we associate with it overshadows the fact that not everyone was hurting. Amidst all the mass suffering and despair, a small minority of people actually managed to thrive by diversifying and developing multiple income streams. You can do the same! Whether it’s investing (Warren Buffet says to be greedy when everyone else is fearful), starting a business, or picking up a second job, anything you can do to spread your risk across more than one thing will make you safer and more secure.

Spend Less to Entertain Yourself


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A hallmark of Depression-era spending habits was spending less to entertain yourself. Rather than spending gobs of money on extravagant nights out on the town, people found joy in life’s simpler and less expensive pursuits – exercise, reading, or enjoying the great outdoors. While you may not be ready to cut all entertainment expenses out of your budget, you can at least buy your thrills wisely. Fly during non-peak times of the year, see matinee showings of movies, and split entertainment costs with friends in a group.

Buy Used


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Buying used clothing is an extreme that many are unwilling to consider, regarding it as “going too far” and scoffing at the idea of ever doing it themselves. But the bare, crass fact is that new clothing is expensive, and when times are tough, the difference between spending $50 or $500 for a similar outfit could mean the difference between keeping the lights on or not. Depression survivors bought used clothing without shame, and if you are feeling the crunch, perhaps it’s time to consider following suit.

Don’t Pay Others For What You Can do For Free


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While it’s true that nothing is truly “free” (there is the opportunity cost of your time to consider), in recession, it often makes sense to do yourself what you would normally pay others for. This includes everything from haircuts to lawn care to accounting and tax preparation. If you have an abundance of free time, spend it on tasks like these and avoid shelling out money for them.

Make Things Yourself Instead of Buying Them


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You would be amazed how far a little ingenuity and resourcefulness will go in preparing your own food, stitching your own clothes, and making other things that you would usually buy. In addition to saving the money you would’ve spent, you will have the satisfaction of using the things you yourself created!

Pretend That You Are Worse Off Than You Are


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People who lived through the Great Depression will tell you that your mindset and overall attitude was just as important (if not more so) than the specific money-saving strategies you used. It took a pervasive mentality of penny-pinching and getting as much from what you had as possible. The best way to cultivate this mentality? Just pretend that you’re broke. Even if you are not technically on the brink of financial ruin, pretending that you are will force you to make decisions differently and more prudently than if you assumed a more comfortable state of affairs.

Do you have other money saving/earning tips to get through the recession in tact? If so, please share them in the comments below.

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{ 55 comments… read them below or add one }

Lisa April 8, 2009 at 8:23 am

Great blog post! We all should practice these strategies, even if we haven’t been downsize/outsized.
Good luck!

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Philip April 8, 2009 at 12:16 pm

This is very true, i think that this will help people get back to the standard needs of live. we as a society are gluttons and it shows.

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Dave Rigotti April 8, 2009 at 2:04 pm

Great tips, thanks! Keep them coming!

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Shawn R April 8, 2009 at 3:52 pm

Great Idea, telling people to not spend money who have it will surely revive an economy badly in need of capital.Anyone who has money should spend it.

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TI April 8, 2009 at 4:05 pm

You are going to have to rely on these tips and more to survive given the changes to our society the Marxists of the Democratic party are doing to us! Heaven help us.

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Capissen April 8, 2009 at 4:17 pm

Reading Neal Stephenson books will help anyone through anything. :)

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BillShrink Guy April 8, 2009 at 4:18 pm

Shawn: I think you’ll notice that beyond some of the cost-cutting tips, we also mentioned suggestions such as developing extra income stream and even moving to where the jobs are located. Both of these will no doubt keep the revenue flowing. The tips really aren’t about hoarding everything and hiding in fear.. but they are simply about finding alternatives while protecting what truly matters (e.g., making the mortgage payment won’t become an issue).

Having said that, obviously some tips aren’t practical — heck, even relocating for jobs can be potentially risky and financially impractical. At the end, it’s all about finding what works for your particular situation.

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Marianne Stabile April 8, 2009 at 4:19 pm

I want an electric meter thing like that–where does one get those? So cool!

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BillShrink Guy April 8, 2009 at 4:45 pm

Marianne: I’ll search online for phrases such as “electricity usage monitor” – “energy cost monitor” – or other variations thereof. The spiffy one pictured above is from Scottish & Southern Energy, a British-based energy company. I haven’t really seen a retail equivalent in the states yet so if anyone else knows.. please chime in.

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Andres Pereyda April 8, 2009 at 4:54 pm

i AM broke, so i have to act as if i’m rich, just so i don’t get too depressed

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lori walker August 25, 2010 at 2:53 pm

how do you act rich. I am really interested in what you do . I am bummed out a lot. my family and I are broke boke too. Smile

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Mark Tali February 7, 2011 at 5:51 am

noo, you act more broke than you really are so that way u will end up finding few dollars saved in your pocket when you NEED it more than anything.

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Mark Baker April 8, 2009 at 6:34 pm

Great (helpful) article that’s very applicable to the times we live in.

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terry April 8, 2009 at 6:51 pm

Eat soups. Not only do you get all of your nutrients without gaining weight you have plenty to go around.

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K. Hill April 8, 2009 at 6:59 pm

Awesome article! All of these ring true for me. People get so caught up in the media and the haves and have-nots that they accrue massive credit debts. As a woman, I’d have to say that a savvy spender is now ranking on the top of my list for what one might find attractive in a partner.

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Christine April 8, 2009 at 7:25 pm

Great site :)

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am April 8, 2009 at 7:59 pm

thank you for publishing this!!!

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Julia April 9, 2009 at 6:54 am

Neat article, but stitching your own clothes these days is far more expensive than buying at a store.

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Anonymous October 26, 2011 at 5:01 pm

I make my own sundresses, blouses, and summer tops. End pieces in cotton at fabric stores (usually in a bin at the end of an aisle) are cheap, and I rework bigger things, like a dress with a stain on it, into something smaller, like a top. A spool of thread= $2.00 and a pack of more needles than I will ever use wasn’t much more. You don’t need a sewing machine to sew. I do a little by hand while I’m watching TV. It’s feels like a big accomplishment when I’m done.

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Marty April 9, 2009 at 8:06 am

One more: learn to repair something (e.g. mechanic) and trade that service with someone capable of repairing something you have need to repair (e.g. computer tech). Bartered services rid huge chunks of tax.

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o ma ma April 9, 2009 at 10:16 pm

it true ~ but hardly to do it …

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BARBARA 'T' April 10, 2009 at 12:38 pm

GREAT START,GOOD IDEAS, I ALREADY AM AN INNER BARGAIN HTR.,
I “WILL” DISCARD “MORE” CATALOGS ‘quicker’!!!
I DO CHECK RECEIPTS. SMART TO BUY IN BULK, I DO ‘SOMETIMES.’
I DO SOMETIMES BUY USED. I DO TRY TO DO IT MYSELF. I LIKE TO
SEW…JUST NEED TO FIND TIME.
I HOPE I AM PRETENDING I AM WORSE OFF THAN I REALLY AM…

WILL WATCH FOR FUTURE ‘TIPS’!

PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE DO NOT GIVE OUT MY WEB SITE..):

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Joe April 11, 2009 at 2:28 am

Car ( Mercedes E320 / 1994): sold ( still crying-lol)
Credit card: cut up too
Installed ENERGY STAR qualified lighting.( save up to more than 50%)
Cancelled all my pay-TV stuff
Food: no McD, Coke…….
Bought some gold and silver coins
Dont trust in government and the banks !!!!

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Rock April 12, 2009 at 8:06 am

Exellent article! But the “reason” for the depression was not something mistical, it was designed. Watch “The Money Masters” on Youtube. Lays it out book, chapter & verse exactly what has happened since fall of ’08, published in 1996…All central banks are privately owned, thus the future is no mistery at all. Tip #17…don’t let the bastards grind you down!

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Andrea April 13, 2009 at 1:10 pm

The last one helps a lot and is something I’ve been doing for years.

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kelly April 15, 2009 at 1:29 pm

I am always reading articles such as this and they are helpful. The current economy has caught up with the rest of the world, it kicked me to the curb about 3 years ago…literally. my husband was injured and unable to work and my daughter was struggling with a chronic emotional and physical illness. I had been dignosed with cancer 3 years before and thank goodness won that battle physically. If we had not had 2 insurances that illness would have taken us down $$wise. My daughters illness was not covered to much of an extent. After a year or so we finally qualified for assistance for her bills and her fathers whose injury was severe also. Hey the good news we are still alive, after bankruptcy, foreclosure and now divorce. What I really want to say is keep hanging on and loving each other. Find ways to keep giving your kids hope. We moved into a rental owned by a friend. I could have found something cheaper but it is a big farmhouse with open skys and my soul feels more free hear and we have a HUGE garden. It made me feel wonderful being able to give fresh vegetables to my friends and feed them to my family. Look for the good in everything and support and protect your family with thing that cost little or nothing.

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Anonymous April 16, 2009 at 11:05 am

go dumpster diving. it has saved my family many hundreds of dollars. oh, and it takes things that would otherwise end up in a land fill.

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Mikko April 16, 2009 at 11:32 am

My gosh, this is amazing. Add to this list the need to avoid active management fees from your money manager. Instead, go index funds for now and avoid the plus 1% taxed against your funds.

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bill r. April 18, 2009 at 10:53 am

Like the scouts say be prepared. If you have a job be a better worker, there’s 100′s more that will do it and for less pay. So suck it up and not be negative, it may not get better for some time.

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Rose April 19, 2009 at 5:03 pm

This is such a great site. I am currently doing a course at University called Family Resource Management and I have a project to do on “surviving” this recession. This information would be so helpful for my project.
Thank you for publishing this :)
Much of the younger generation seem to have difficulty following this advice and understanding its importance.

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Betsy Bargain April 23, 2009 at 3:05 pm

Lots of great tips, thank you. One thing I would add – try repairing things instead of buying a new one. I thought I would have to buy a new watering can when mine sprung a leak. My sister suggested repairing it with tub and shower caulking. It worked great! Duh, why didn’t I think of that?!

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Johanna Buckley April 26, 2009 at 5:53 pm

Saw and article about your site in my Goodhouse Keeping magazine and here i am. I found your site to be really helpful to me. I’m on social security and i get some of my husbands pension, which isn’t much, and it’s really difficult to make ends meet. There are times i wish that the beginning of the month would come a lot faster then it does. Hopefully i’ll be able to use of lot of your suggestions. Thank you oh so much. Hope to reading more really soon.

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marc April 28, 2009 at 11:46 pm

Hmmm.
I thought these ideas were obvious. I’m also surprised that people think the ideas are so new and exciting. Keep up the good work. It sounds like it’s needed.
Marc

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Meshia May 8, 2009 at 6:18 am

Saving money is hard for all of us and non of us feel like cutting back on our lifestyle but I have found a good saving without loosing anything. I canceled my cell phone contract and bought a prepaid Tracfone and now I am saving about $35 per month and I am still making the same number of calls. I then was able to cancel my land line because Tracfone gives me long distance and international calls to about 60 country’s for the same rate as a local call. The savings are going half towards paying off debt and the other half to an emergency savings account.

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Jim Orrison May 22, 2009 at 2:33 pm

I lost so much money. I didn’t know it was invested in AIG and the banks, supposedly safe blue chip places. What I have learned is that if you die then there are less mouths to fee d and less bodies to clothe. This leaves more money for my family members and that’s the best way to help them.

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Elizabeth Farnworth February 9, 2012 at 3:38 am

well maybe u should have not made so much crappy choices and u wouldnt be in debt like idk eating at home instead of eating out every night just wanted to make sure that u r aware of the mistakes u made and its not everybody elses fault just thought i would give u that lil tip.bye.

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Janie Eddins July 2, 2009 at 1:44 pm

Great article. My grandmother always said, “Use it up, wear it out, make do, do without.” I’ve followed this advice all my life, and I’m sure glad now I have. I don’t look so eccentric now. You don’t have to buy everything you see. Buy what you absolutely must have to keep body and soul together and SAVE THE REST!! Avoid debt like the plague. If you can’t afford a car then WALK or take public transportation. Think before you spend. Great article–much can be learned from the Great Depression era.

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j. July 28, 2009 at 1:19 pm

I loved these tips. I was wondering, does anyone know, how can we stop having junk mail delivered to our mailboxes? It distracts me to see pretty pictures of stuff I seriously want but cannot afford at all. Is there someplace we can call and quit it from being delivered at all? We get at least a half dozen fliers a day and its too much trash anyway. I will check back incase anyone knows…

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Jonny September 13, 2009 at 4:45 am

To be honest if you want to say money dont do anything lol.
Try to limit on everything, food, car, shopping and buy what you need not what you want. Also just keep looking onwards to pay day.

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Anonymous October 24, 2009 at 5:31 am

thank you. One thing I would add – try repairing things instead of buying a new one. I thought I would have to buy a new watering can when mine sprung a leak. My sister suggested repairing it with tub and shower caulking. It worked great! Duh, why didn’t I think of that?!

http://johnteshblog.typepad.com/john_tesh_blog/2009/09/what-makes-these-three-moneysaving-tips-so-amazing-theyre-nobrainer-ideas.html

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Leigh December 11, 2009 at 12:47 pm

I am only 50 but can’t believe how everyone needs advice on how to survive an economic disaster or how anyone even got into an bad economic situation. Health problems should be the only excuse.
It is all common sense and a no brainer. Using old fashioned common sense of living within your means, getting lots of education and skills, saving well, and most importantly, trusting in the Lord and praying for strength and guidance will solve it all. What else is there? For crying out loud! Stupidity and greed are the shameful culprits of finding ones self in the very condition our stupid and godless government is in. Our forefathers and ancestors are twirling in their graves.

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mike March 1, 2010 at 4:18 pm

Good collection of tips to save money.

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Michelle March 16, 2010 at 1:10 pm

“When you find out you can do without it and go along not thinking about it, I’ll tell you somethin’ true. The bare necessities of life will come to you.” Jungle Book

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indigo March 16, 2010 at 4:31 pm

great tips!! we’ll need to use as many as we can to get out of the hole the fascist Republicans put us in!

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me February 4, 2011 at 2:20 pm

Yeah! Shame on them for trying to cut taxes and for not printing a bunch of worthless money that is sending the U.S. economy down the toilet right now! Shame, shame, shame!

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Rosech August 22, 2011 at 8:17 am

Love it when you blame the Repubs for your stupidity, along with the prez and Demos under whose reign I have lived more years than you. You choose how you work, spend and live. Unfortunately, intelligence does not run rampant in America today due to lousy public education which is why I do not teach any longer because I actually wanted to teach real history and teach students whose parents trained their attitude to learn! Reusing, recyling and being frugal is something we can all do. Who really needs cable TV or TVs in practically every room? Who needs a surfeit of cars, clothes, and so on. You are spoiled by your own spending and lifestyle so don’t blame anyone else.

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Jo May 3, 2010 at 7:04 pm

Eat less meat and more pasta, beans, and vegetables.Don’t use your credit cards,cut them up you can always get them back if you really need them.keep lights off when you don’t need them-flush every third time-my water bill went from 80 or more dollars to 46.00,it’s ok to do that if your at home alone…why not?don’t buy something unless you really need it-buy at a thrift store.Make do with less recycle,reuse and use again.

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Lovely May 21, 2010 at 3:56 am

I think most people would agree that saving money is something “easier said than done”. Personally, I believe it’s a mind-set that needs to be developed by creating good money-saving habits.

Here are some things I’ve done to help change my spending habits:

- Cooking more at home ? Eating out is very expensive especially if you do it a couple times a week
- Shopping online ? You can find better deals than in the store and you save on gas (I recommend http://www.shoptivity.com)
- Paying the full balance on credit cards each month ? Interest charge is like giving away free money
- Don’t forget to pay yourself ? Set up an online savings account (they pay higher interest than a normal savings account)
- Setting a budget and goals ? It’s good to have your goals written down so you see them everyday and don’t lose focus on your ultimate objectives

Again, saving money requires a lot of patience and hard work. However, you’ll thank yourself later on in life. Good luck everyone!! =)

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william August 29, 2010 at 5:55 pm

People say I cant save I will tell you what I did,
Cut Cable from 104 a month to 63 a month
Moved one vehicle to liability saves 40 a month
Use coupons with groceries saves 280 a month for a family of 4
Stop smoking 2 packs a day havent had one 28 months saved 8400.00 to date.
Take lunch and so does kids to work and school saving 900 a year
so far minor cuts have saved my household 740.00 a month
This allows me to put additional 6000.00 a year in my 401k as well as my 2700.00 into my defined retirement,
So If you think it cant be done look at your output

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Toni Medina October 1, 2010 at 9:18 pm

This is very beneficial and helps a lot. Another way to save money that a lot of people don’t do; whether ashamed or don’t have the time is, save all your coins. Every penny, nickle, dime and quarter, save it all!

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JB b.1947 July 18, 2011 at 6:01 pm

Think about what you NEED to live.
When I was 1 yr. old (youngest of 4) my parents purchased 17 acres of land for $800. and we lived in a tarpaper shack until I was 9 yrs. old. My Dad was, after a few years, able to build a home on the land himself. I didn’t know we were poor until I was at middle school age. Between jobs my dad (a logger) and brother hunted and fished and we all tended the small farm. We raised beef, pork, chickens and rabbits for food. A separator was used to make our cream and butter by churning it. We never went hungry and always had a roof over our heads. The only money we owed anyone was the grocery, where you were able to put some amount of groceries on a tab and pay it when you could.

My parents were married in 1929 shortly before the depression and never forgot the lessons learned.

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Rosech August 22, 2011 at 8:13 am

We were poor. We ate soups a lot and neighbors passed along a soup bone down the block so everyone had some flavoring. We ate chicken or a roast on Sundays only. Cookies for 10 kids was purchased on our father’s payday and then no more until next payday. We purchased one new outfit and shoes for school and another at Easter. We purchased small, inexpensive Christmas trees. We purchased vegetables at the farmer’s market in summer to can for winter (this was in the Mid-West). These habits passed through all my life and so the house mortgage was paid early and we saved thousands in interest. We purchased quality wood furniture when we married and still have it today because we were taught to take care of everything! We do not buy anything that is not needed. We purchase certain food items in quantity (thank you, Costco) and freeze a lot by using coupons and common sense. We eat out for good food and only once in a while for KFC extra crispy. We have a garden so we truly have real organic produce which we eat, share, freeze or can. Worth all this? You bet. It allows us to have extra funds for travel and always purchasing quality items! We do not feel poor nor deprived. Our home lacks nothing but does not have every frill and fancy either. We use Shaklee health care products and are both healthy, active, and mentally acute in our mid- and late 70′s. Guess we did all the right things and enjoy our lives as we go further forward. Frugality is one thing, ignorant spending is another.

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Sue A October 9, 2011 at 9:17 pm

I have sewn for years and now sell my stuff-doesn’t pay all the bills but takes care of Holidays, Birthdays, etc. I have made PJs and crafts for the family for years and they now look forward to what might be made for them. I also bought different themed fabrics and ribbons on sale with coupons for about $.50 to $.75 a yard to wrap presents in. I’ve done this for about 10 years now and the Christmas tree or Birthday table looks just as colorful as if you had bought expensive wrapping paper (which I haven’t bought for 10 years). By reusing the fabrics and ribbons every year as wrapping paper there is less to throw away for the landfills! Friends and extended family also appreciate the fabric wrapping because it’s unique and they can reuse it for other things (crafts, coasters, cleaning or just rags). It sounds like a small thing but for me started habits of reusing everything as least once. My customers don’t mind receiving their items in cereal boxes or oatmeal cans or kleenix boxes-they give positive responses like ‘clever packaging’ or ‘unique shipping container’. People really do appreciate items made just for them. I believe I have saved thousands in the 10 years and look forward to finding ways to save and reuse more.

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family counseling May 9, 2012 at 7:16 pm

My mother always sad that credit cards are tools of the devil. These are great ways to save on cash! Never criticize second-hand or bargain stores. They may surprise you. Thanks for sharing!

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Mary June 7, 2012 at 8:08 am

I don’t know why people can not control their spending- I am very conscious of everything I have and everything I buy. I don’t spend foolishly and I try to cut corners whenever possible. I use food coupons whenever possible. I go online every thursday and see what specials are on sale at my local supermarkets and then i do my shoppig based upon that. I cut out coupons from the sunday paper. I even have recently found medication coupons that I can use on my prescription drugs and over the counter stuff like cough syrup, tums and stuff like that. If you go to Medicationcoupons.com you can access a whole bunch of medication coupons. They also offer a free discount card bt it can only be used on meds that aren’t covered by insurance- thank g-d my husband has good insurance.

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